Theories of probability
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Theories of probability an examination of logical and qualitative foundations by Louis Narens

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Published by World Scientific in Hackensack, NJ .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Probabilities

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-212) and index

StatementLouis Narens
SeriesAdvanced series on mathematical psychology -- v. 2
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQA273.4 .N37 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 219 p. ;
Number of Pages219
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17243073M
ISBN 109812708014
ISBN 109789812708014
LC Control Number2007018216

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Philosophical Theories of Probability is the first book to present a clear, comprehensive and systematic account of these various theories and to explain how they relate to one another. Gillies also offers a distinctive version of the propensity theory of probability, and the intersubjective interpretation, which develops the subjective theory. The book also examines the origin of subjective probability as a by-product of the development of individual judgments into decisions. Finally, it suggests that none of the known theories of probability covers the whole domain of engineering and scientific practice. Theories of Probability: An Examination of Foundations reviews the theoretical foundations of probability, with emphasis on concepts that are important for the modeling of random phenomena and the design of information processing systems. Topics covered range from axiomatic comparative and quantitative probability to the role of relative frequency in the measurement of . Philosophical Theories of Probability is the first book to present a clear, comprehensive and systematic account of these various theories and to explain how they relate to one another. Gillies also offers a distinctive version of the propensity theory of probability, and the intersubjective interpretation, which develops the subjective by:

Theories Probability. You Searched For: Condition: POOR. Noticeably used book. Heavy wear to cover. Pages contain marginal notes, underlining, and or highlighting. Possible ex library copy, with all the markings/stickers of that library. Accessories such as CD, codes, toys, and dust jackets may not be included. PROBABILITY THEORY { THE LOGIC OF SCIENCE VOLUME I { PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTARY APPLICATIONS Chapter 1 Plausible Reasoning 1 Deductive and Plausible Reasoning 1 Analogies with Physical Theories 3 The Thinking Computer 4 Introducing the Robot 5 Boolean Algebra 6 Adequate Sets of Operations 9 The Basic Desiderata 12 Comments 15File Size: KB. If anybody asks for a recommendation for an introductory probability book, then my suggestion would be the book by Henk Tijms, Understanding Probability, second edition, Cambridge University Press, This book first explains the basic ideas and concepts of probability through the use of motivating real-world examples before presenting the theory in a very clear way.   Philosophical Theories of Probability is the first book to present a clear, comprehensive and systematic account of these various theories and to explain how they relate to one another. The Twentieth Century has seen a dramatic rise in the use of probability and statistics in almost all fields of research/5.

"This is a remarkable book, a theory of probability that succeeds in being both readable and rigorous, both expository and entertaining. One might have thought that there was no space left in the market for books on the fundamentals of probability theory, but this volume provides a refreshing new approach it is a magnificent undertaking, impeccably presented, and one Cited by: Review of basic probability theory We hope that the reader has seen a little basic probability theory previously. We will give a very quick review; some references for further reading appear at the end of the chapter. In case of formatting errors you .   P robability Probability is the measure of the likelihood that an event will occur in a Random Experiment. Probability is quantified as a number between 0 and 1, where, loosely speaking, 0 indicates impossibility and 1 indicates certainty. The higher the probability of an event, the more likely it is that the event will : Parag Radke.   Philosophical Theories of Probability is the first book to present a clear, comprehensive and systematic account of these various theories and to explain how they relate to one another. Gillies also offers a distinctive version of the propensity theory of probability, and the intersubjective interpretation, which develops the subjective theory.4/5(1).